The Heart of Creativity

by | Sep 3, 2014 | Balance | 0 comments

© alphaspirit - Fotolia.com

© alphaspirit – Fotolia.com

I believe everyone is a creative genius at heart.  After all, we come from the same source don’t we?  Why do some have talents that lie in poetry, while some have the talent to design landscapes on canvas or in backyards?  What is creativity and how do we perceive it through our senses?

My spark of creativity was ignited at the young age of 6.  Perhaps it was before then, but my first ingrained memory was a poem I wrote in grade 1.  I went on to speak on stage and the poem itself was published in a small book named The Northern Lights.  My creativity, aided by an older “reading buddy” was revealed.  I went on to have another poem published later on in life that originated from deep emotional pain.  It felt like a force compelled me to write.  I felt and I listened.

Expression does not come easily to everyone.  Perhaps our personalities are involved and it depends on how we reveal ourselves in the world.  I can only speak for myself when I mention that an introvert, like myself, is fueled by an intrinsic dimension.  Creativity comes from a place of introspection.  I do not fare well with a buzz of information being fired from outside sources.  A team meeting where the expectation of feedback is required immediately does not fuel my creativity.  For extroverts, this situation may brew their creative elixir, and they are able to contribute in the moment.  My formula for success in this situation would be to ingest the information, analyse for a day or two, then contribute.

Perhaps creativity is felt and expressed differently depending on our learning styles?  Learning styles encompass a series of theories suggesting systematic differences in an individual’s natural or habitual pattern of acquiring and processing information.  I am a kinesthetic person which means I learn through touching and doing.  The word kinesthetic describes the sense of using muscular movement — physical sense in other words.  Kinesthetic therefore describes a learning style which involves the stimulation of nerves in the body’s muscles, joints and tendons. Other styles are Visual, where you learn through seeing and reading while Auditory people learn through listening and speaking.

Therefore, it makes sense that I love an endorphin high.  Running on the treadmill, working out with weights, breathing hard and sweating out my inner demons always leads me to a place of gratitude.  My heart becomes efficient in more than pumping blood.  A floodgate is opened to reveal the creative juices.   Listening to music also has an effect on our nervous system and is an opening to creativity.  Listening to the sound waves penetrating our cells and nerves while strengthening our muscles is quite stimulating.  Creative insights are revealed to me while running from my intrinsic source.  While I am at the gym, they may be revealed to me while encountering a conversation.  The creative source is all around if we are open to listen while remaining open-hearted.

For artists, entrepreneurs and any other driven creators, exercise is a powerful tool in the quest to transform the persistent uncertainty, fear and anxiety that accompanies the quest to create from a source of suffering into something less toxic, then potentially into fuel.  Exercise, it turns out, especially at higher levels of intensity, is an incredible potent tool in the quest to train in the arts of the fear alchemist.”  Jonathan Fields.

 

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Kristen Large
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